Five Household Chemicals That Are Dropping Your Testosterone Levels Xenoestrogens

Your testosterone levels are at the lowest when compared to your ancestors. 

The testosterone levels are reducing at the rate of  1% every year, irrespective of age.

In 8 years the testosterone levels show a significant decrease. The study was conducted in 1988 and 1996. The testosterone levels of 50-year-old men in 1988 are higher than 50-year-old men in 1996.

Five Household Chemicals That Are Dropping Your Testosterone Levels

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So what causes this drop in testosterone levels.

Your habits, as well as the environment, contribute to this dropping testosterone levels. The air we breathe, the food and the cosmetics; everything is contaminated with those chemicals that are harmful to your endocrine system.

Your endocrine glands produce hormones that control various body functions. The chemicals will interfere with the endocrine system and disrupt hormone synthesis.

These chemicals can be found in plastic, personal care, and cosmetic products.

So what are these chemicals?

These chemicals are called xenoestrogens. They mimic some structural parts of endogenous estrogens. Thus xenoestrogens may act or interfere with the actions of estrogens. (Study 1)

let's see the five chemicals that cause a drop in the testosterone levels.


#1 Parabens

Parabens are preservatives that are added to personal care products and cosmetics to prevent the growth of microbes. They can be absorbed even through the skin.

The parabens are a group of chemicals usually added as ethylparaben, butylparaben, isobutylparaben, isopropylparaben, methylparaben, and propylparaben.

Most of the personal care products contain water. Parabens are used to prevent the growth of microbes.

Parabens will cause endocrine disruptions by mimicking estrogen. (study 2)

Butylparaben and propylparaben have the most estrogen a#referencectivity. Ethylparaben and methylparaben have lower to no estrogen activity. (Study 3)

Parabens can block androgen and inhibit the enzymes that metabolize estrogen. (Study 4) (Study 5)

Regular use on skin can cause skin cancer. Using skin care products that contain methylparaben can cause UV induced damage to skin cells.

Propyl and butylparaben affect sperm production and testosterone levels, while methylparaben and ethylparaben don't affect sperm production. (Study 6) (Study 7)

You can find paraben in


Skin care products like shampoo, cleansers, sunscreen, conditioners, facial showers, lotion, cleansers, and scrubs.

 Personal care products like toothpaste, deodorant, shaving gels.

How to avoid intake of paraben


Always look for and try to avoid anything with paraben like Methylparaben, Ethylparaben, Propylparaben, Butylparaben.(study 8) Read the label thoroughly.


#2 Bisphenol A

Bisphenol A or BPA is a chemical used to make plastic and epoxy resins. Polycarbonate plastic is used to make containers to store food and study 9. Epoxy resins are used to coat the inside of metal cans, used to store food.

Research had shown that BPA would sweep into the food that is stored in the container made with BPA. (study 9)

BPA is also used in the manufacture of thermal paper, which is used in a cash registry, credit card machines, etc. The paper is coated with BPA. The urine samples show an increased level of BPA with even a single touch on the receipt. (study 10)

This study shows that BPA was associated with lower total testosterone levels in men, while it increases the testosterone levels in girls. (study 11)

BPA interferes with the Leydig cells of testes thus affecting the biosynthesis of testosterone. It also interferes with spermatogenesis, affecting sperm count. (study 12)

The study thus proves the relation between increased urine concentration of BPA and declining male sexual function.

European Union and Canada had banned the use of BPA in baby bottles.

You can find BPA in


Food Cans

Reusable plastic bottle

Thermal paper

How to avoid intake of BPA


Try to use BPA free products.

 Use glass or stainless steel instead of plastic containers.

Do not heat poly carbonate plastic in the microwave, as it may cause the BPA to sweep into the food.

Reduce the use of can, canned food.

Don’t touch the printed side of thermal paper.

​

#3 Phthalates

Phthalates are used to make PVC more flexible and resilient. They will increase flexibility, transparency, longevity, and durability. Its also used as solvents in cosmetics and other consumer products.

But they are one of the biggest threat to manliness. They interfere with the production of testosterone by interfering with an enzyme required for testosterone production. (study 13)

Phthalates cause reduced circulating testosterone levels. Studies show that increased exposure can cause a 30% reduction in testosterone levels. (study 14)  

Read the label before buying and try to avoid phthalates and fragrance. Its harder to find the presence of phthalates by reading the label. The laws allow the use of phthalates in fragrance, and they are not required to disclose it to consumers.

It's difficult to spot phthalates. A study was done on cosmetics find out that 72 products that had phthalates didn’t have it on the label.

You can find Phthalates in


Color cosmetics,

fragranced lotions,

body washes,

hair care products,

nail polish

How to avoid intake of Phthalates


Try buying phthalates free toys for kids.

Choose nature-friendly cosmetics and skin care products.

Choose fresh foods and avoid processed foods. 

Choose glass bottles to store foods instead of plastic.

Try to avoid air fresheners and scented candles.


#4 Triclosan and Triclocarban

Triclosan is used as an antimicrobial in soaps and detergents. It was used as antibacterial scrub for medical practitioners. But nowadays it's even added to vegetable cutting boards, and shoes to avoid bacterial growth and odor. (study 15)

The use of these antibacterial will cause the rise of new resistant bacteria.

Triclosan causes a decrease in thyroid hormone concentration. 

Triclocarban amplifies the endocrine activity when paired with naturally occurring hormones. (study 16)

Triclosan exposure has been associated with reduced testosterone, luteinizing hormone, FSH and sperm production. (study 17​study 18​​​)

Triclosan has a weak

estrogenic effect. It also interferes with estrogen and androgen systems. (study 18)

It also increases the estrogenic activity of synthetic estrogenic compounds. (study 19)

The researchers conclude that the studies point out that the estrogenic effect of triclosan is due to the inhibition of estrogen metabolism. (study 20)  

Triclosan exposure reduces semen quality. (study 21)

Triclosan exposure has been associated with reduced testosterone, luteinizing hormone, FSH and sperm production. (study 22)

You can find Triclosan in


Toothpaste,

tooth whitening products,

deodorants,

shaving products,

creams,

shoes,

and clothing.

How to avoid intake of Triclosan


Avoid products contain Triclosan and Triclocarban.

Stick with plain soap and water.

#5 Benzophenone

Benzophenone is used in cosmetics and sunscreen to protect it from UV light. It is added to soaps and personal care products to enhance the fragrance and to preserve the scent and color under UV light.

It is used in sunglass and UV safe containers. The benzophenone can sweep into food from the bowl.

Benzophenone can cause cancer, endocrine disruptions. The main benzophenones are BP2, BP3, Oxybenzone, Sulisobenzone, and Sulisobenzone sodium.

Look for the label with the name Benzophenone, BP whether BP2 or BP3.

There are not enough studies to support the estrogenic activity of benzophenone. But its metabolites have estrogenic activity. (​study 23​​​)  

You can find Benzophenone in


Lip balm,

nail polish,

foundations,

baby sunscreens,

fragrance,

shampoo,

conditioner,

hair spray, 

moisturizers,

and foundation

How to avoid intake of Benzophenone


Read labels and avoid products containing these chemicals.

Choose sunscreens that rely on non-nanoized zinc oxide or titanium dioxide.

Reference

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Arun Kumar T
 

Arun is the founder @workoutable. He is Learning different ways to transform his body from fat to fit. Himself as a crash test dummy, experimenting with his body. He is trying to help people to transform their body.

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